iwatchyousleepinanoncreepyway
third-round-charm:

distraction:

Not many people know the stereotypical heart shape was meant to be two hearts fused together

Hey there. History nerd here… not many people know this “fact” because it’s not true. The universal heart shape we recognize today has nothing to do with the heart, actually. It has to do with early Roman birth control.The Romans used a plant called silphium to prevent pregnancy. It was so effective that it became a critical part of Rome’s economy and daily life. It was literally so important to their culture that the image of it’s seed were even imprinted on currency. It’s the exact shape of the heart we know today, and this is the first time it’s visage was ever recorded in history. It was so important to them, and so highly prized that they actually drove the plant into extinction by over harvesting it for use. This shape was so ingrained in their society’s conscious as a symbol of sexual liberation that it became associated with all aspects of intimacy, eg. sex, unity, and love.TL;DR: It’s not two hearts sewn together. It’s an ancient plant that Romans used to have gratuitous amounts of sex before condoms were around.

third-round-charm:

distraction:

Not many people know the stereotypical heart shape was meant to be two hearts fused together


Hey there. History nerd here… not many people know this “fact” because it’s not true. The universal heart shape we recognize today has nothing to do with the heart, actually. It has to do with early Roman birth control.

The Romans used a plant called silphium to prevent pregnancy. It was so effective that it became a critical part of Rome’s economy and daily life. It was literally so important to their culture that the image of it’s seed were even imprinted on currency.

It’s the exact shape of the heart we know today, and this is the first time it’s visage was ever recorded in history. It was so important to them, and so highly prized that they actually drove the plant into extinction by over harvesting it for use.

This shape was so ingrained in their society’s conscious as a symbol of sexual liberation that it became associated with all aspects of intimacy, eg. sex, unity, and love.

TL;DR:
It’s not two hearts sewn together. It’s an ancient plant that Romans used to have gratuitous amounts of sex before condoms were around.

rukafais

art-of-swords:

Smallsword with Scabbard

  • Dated: 1781-82
  • Pleace of Origin: Made in London, England, Europe
  • Medium: etched steel [blade]; engraved and gilded silver, wood, gilded copper wire [hilt]; metallic threads and silk [sword-knot]; wood, parchment, engraved and gilded silver [scabbard]

Hilt made by silversmith and hiltmaker William Kinman, English (active London), born 1728, last recorded 1797

Source: Copyright © 2014 Philadelphia Museum of Art

phobs-heh

medievalwallpainting:

This is the doom mural at Chaldon Church in Surrey. It dates to the 1200s, making it one of the first images to portray the idea of purgatory and the ladder of salvation in Britain.

This is a particularly busy painting, featuring the ladder of salvation (centre), the seven deadly sins (bottom right) as well as the horrors that await in hell, and purgatory, and the weighing of souls.

Photos by medievalwallpainting

rukafais

art-of-swords:

Presentation Sword for General Joaquín Sinforiano de Jesús Crespo Torre

  • Dated:  third quarter of the 19th Century
  • Place of Origin: Venezuela
  • Measurements: overall length 94 cm

The sword features a straight, double-edged blade of fine Damascus steel, triangular section, hexagonal toward the tip, the rectangular one finely engraved and gilt on blue ground with dedication "A. SCHRIEVER AL GENERAL J. CRESPO EN MUESTRA DE ADMIRACION" among floral motifs on a side, and Venezuela coat of arms among floral motifs on the other.

At the back lies the name of the German manufacturer "WEYERSBERG, KIRSCHBAUM & CO. SOLINGEN", on a marked tang. The beautiful, gilt bronze hilt is richly pierced shell-guard with Venezuela coat of arms at the centre, counter-valve pierced with leaves, at the guard the in-he-round of a winged goddess, the head of a gryphon at the upper edge.

The pommel comes with the monogram “JC” as for Joaquin Crespo, decorated with cherubs and laurels. The metallic grip is partially blackened and at the front features the effigy of the war goddess. The sword is presented in its leather scabbard, which is damaged, but still has its gilt bronze mounts, richly pierced and belt hooks in the shape of Medusa’s head. The scabbard also has three suspension rings.

Sidenotes:

  1. Joaquín Sinforiano de Jesús Crespo Torres (22 August 1841 – 16 April 1898) was a politician, soldier, and a member of the Great Liberal Party of Venezuela.
  2. He was also the President of Venezuela from 1884 to 1886 and again from 1892 to 1898. He probably received this sword when he was nominated Chief of Staff.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.