jenovasilver
fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

The young woman pictured above is Sophie Scholl, a member of the famous German Resistance group, the White Rose. 
Even at a young age Sophie was a reader and a thinker. In secondary school, Sophie joined the League of German Girls, a Nazi youth group, as did most of her classmates. However, as she grew older and attained her own political opinions, she came to detest the Nazi ideology. 
Later, she entered the University of Munich, where her brother was studying at the time. During her time as a college student, she was horrified by the letters that came from her boyfriend Fritz Hartnagel, who was deployed to the Eastern Front. She also learned about the systematic holocaust that was kept a secrete. To Sophie, her Lutheran faith played a huge role in the development of her political ideologies. 
In 1942, the members of White Rose co-authored an anti-Nazi leaflet. After Sophie found out about her brother’s Hans’ involvement with the organization, she petitioned to join, too. In the early spring of 1943, she, her brother, and friend Christopher Probst were caught distributing the 6th leaflet. They were put on a show trial in People’s Court and were condemned to execution. Before she died, she said: “such a fine, sunny day, and I have to go. But what does my death matter, if through us thousands of people are awakened and stirred to action?”
It was said that before the three young people were executed, they were allowed to sit in a room and talk for a while, and enjoy a cigarette together.
Sophie was the first to go. 

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

The young woman pictured above is Sophie Scholl, a member of the famous German Resistance group, the White Rose. 

Even at a young age Sophie was a reader and a thinker. In secondary school, Sophie joined the League of German Girls, a Nazi youth group, as did most of her classmates. However, as she grew older and attained her own political opinions, she came to detest the Nazi ideology. 

Later, she entered the University of Munich, where her brother was studying at the time. During her time as a college student, she was horrified by the letters that came from her boyfriend Fritz Hartnagel, who was deployed to the Eastern Front. She also learned about the systematic holocaust that was kept a secrete. To Sophie, her Lutheran faith played a huge role in the development of her political ideologies. 

In 1942, the members of White Rose co-authored an anti-Nazi leaflet. After Sophie found out about her brother’s Hans’ involvement with the organization, she petitioned to join, too. In the early spring of 1943, she, her brother, and friend Christopher Probst were caught distributing the 6th leaflet. They were put on a show trial in People’s Court and were condemned to execution. Before she died, she said: “such a fine, sunny day, and I have to go. But what does my death matter, if through us thousands of people are awakened and stirred to action?”

It was said that before the three young people were executed, they were allowed to sit in a room and talk for a while, and enjoy a cigarette together.

Sophie was the first to go. 

gonespoopy-deactivated20140224

Menachem Bodner’s birth name was Elias Gottesmann. He was held in Auschwitz during World War II, where he and his twin brother were victims of Dr. Josef Mengele, known for his obsession and gruesome experimentation with twins.

When the 4-year-old Bodner was liberated from the camp, he was separated from his brother. Now, 68 years later, Bodner has enlisted the help of a professional genealogist, Ayana KimRon, to track down Jeno Gottesmann. Red Cross records indicate that a boy with Jeno’s “A-7734” tattoo was treated at a hospital near Bodner’s camp just two weeks after the liberation. But, eventually, the trail goes cold.

So, KimRon turned to the Internet for help.

confusedlucifer

sydneyflapper:

wonderfinch:

unhistorical:

Victorian-era portraits of African-Americans, 1899 or 1900; from a collection assembled by W.E.B. Du Bois for the Exposition Nègres d’Amerique of the1900 Exposition Universelle. 

Library of Congress

Fuck everyone who says black people look wrong in period clothing or would not have had access to this sort of clothing. Just seriously fuck you.

William Edward Burghardt “W. E. B.” Du Bois is a fascinating and inspiring figure, an uncompromising civil rights activist (literally uncompromising - he rejected Booker T Washington’s Atlanta Compromise, an unwritten deal struck with Southern leaders in the aftermath of the Reconstruction era, in which African-Americans would submit to.discrimination, segregation, lack of voting rights and non-unionized employment and in return Southern whites would “permit” blacks to receive a basic education, some economic opportunities, and justice within the legal system; Du Bois called for nothing less than full equal rights.)

Du Bois and Booker T Washington, who together organised the Exposition Nègres d’Amerique, worked with Washington’s friend Frances Benjamin Johnston (a pioneering female photographer and photojournalist) to take photos of students at the Hampton Institute. The photographs were specifically compiled to counter stereotypes and the predominant white narrative about African-Americans, showcasing their success and diversity. The exhibition won several awards.